Coldplay fans are least likely to have sex, ever, under any circumstances, as per science.

Posted on by TheLastPsychiatrist and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

coldplay, kanye, sex

A poll tries to relate band preference to likelihood of sex on the first date.

We don’t know what it is about “Smells like teen spirit” and “Come as you are” that get Nirvana fans going, but apparently, in one recent poll, they’re the ones most likely to have sex on a first date, while Coldplay fans are most likely to chat and run.

The obvious explanation is that Coldplay sucks the life force out of your soul and makes you want to pretend to be a country singer, and, indeed, most explanations have relied on some sort of psychological explanation of the music.

But break it down. You are a Coldplay, Adele, and Lady Gaga fan.  Indeed, you like them so much you voted.  What are you?  Answer: a girl.

You are a Gorrilaz to Metallica fan.  What are you?  Answer: a boy.

Ergo.  Who is more likely to declare themselves likely to have sex on the first date?

But there are some girls who like Gorrilaz, right?  Yes, they are troubled girls with an affinity for marijuana and a father who’s going/gone.

The point here isn’t this study, so quickly featured by the media who long for something interesting to talk about.  (Protip: just come to Partial Objects.  Consider it show prep.)

The point is that this teaches us an important lesson about medicine and sociology.  Be very suspicious of any association study that shows a very significant relationship between two variables, but does not contain the words, “matched for age and gender”– and socioeconomic status and diet and lunar cycle and age at first penetration and.. 

Related posts:

  1. WSJ to Women: Only Have Sex With Winners
  2. Hotter than the Remix

7 Responses to Coldplay fans are least likely to have sex, ever, under any circumstances, as per science.

  1. JohnJ says:

    So I missed the obvious explanation. You don’t have to rub it in.

  2. Guy Fox says:

    “Be very suspicious of any association study that shows a very significant relationship between two variables, but does not contain the words, “matched for age and gender”– and socioeconomic status and diet and lunar cycle and age at first penetration and.. ”

    -The cure of including a ‘standard’ array of control variables in a linear regression models is often worse than the disease in practice, viz. http://cmp.sagepub.com/content/20/2/1.short

    • mwigdahl says:

      Using a “standard” array of control variables might not be a great idea for every case, but that practice is kind of like someone putting salt and pepper in their orange juice or on their birthday cake because they “always season their food”. It’s lazy analytics. Correcting for gender (and possibly age) in this case (and likely in many other psychological association studies) makes a whole lot of sense.

  3. Comus says:

    Now where are those error bars when you need them? I demand this to be in proper APA form, I’ve lost the ability to casually browse through statistics. Surely the people who listen to tastebuds.fm are already a select bunch, and from those the people who participate in a survey about musical preference and sexual behaviour skews it further down the bad sample alley.

    • ATraveller says:

      I don’t think they’ve even calculated the standard deviations. Going back to the original study, we find that it was done by a dating site, Tastebuds.fm. To quote:

      We asked our members – “How far would you go on a first date?” giving the three possible answers:

      I’d only meet up for a chat
      Perhaps a kiss
      All the way, if there was chemistry
      The question received 408 responses in the space of a week. We looked at the average response for people who were fans of each of Last.fm’s top 20 most popular artists (week ending Sunday 27th March 2011) and assigned a score of 1 for the first answer, 2 for the second and 3 for the third.

      So, what does the Y-axis represent? An averaged response. Is the difference between the different groups significant? No clue. Although we are told that they obtained 408 answers, then there is no indication of how those answers are distributed into groups – the rawdata is hidden from us. If only six Metallica fans answered, and five of those were extremely randy, the data may be skewed to kingdom come and we have no way of finding it out.

      Secondly, is the difference that we are looking at even real? Note that the scale starts at 2, and if we do a bit generous estimate, the difference between the highest and the lowest scores is 0.4. We have no idea if that’s statistically significant (yeah, you can lie a lot with statistics, but only because most people have no clue how to read or use them – me included). Still, in all cases, your chances for a kiss and more, seem fairly good in all circumstances, if the chemistry is right.

      Lets go back to the beginning here – these people are being asked what they’d do on a first date, if the chemistry was right. I’d not be surprized if you’d get a similar result, even if you corrected for gender. The framing almost sets you up for sex, question is just how much of it.

      That might be something to consider before you grow you hair long and start hanging out at Metallica concerts.

  4. mwigdahl says:

    The study is horribly flawed, of course, but the bigger question is: why are we reading about a crappy survey run by tastebuds.fm, a third-rate hookup site, at all? They posted a small survey with flippant, multiple-choice answers, graphed the results, and it ends up on Today’s website?

    Consider the source — one Athima Chansanchai, founder and president of Tima Media, a social media promotion and PR site. It’s her analysis that tries to slather the results with a shiny coating of scientism. Of course, there’s no mention of sample size, bias, or anything other than an authoritative, sensational analysis.

    Here’s the bio section from her website, http://www.timamedia.com:

    Athima Chansanchai | Founder/President, Tima Media

    With more than a decade as an award-winning journalist for Pulitzer Prize-winning newspapers and popular web sites, professional writer/editor Athima Chansanchai is a communications specialist who works with clients to solve problems and achieve business objectives through creating and producing customized content. She writes concise, creative and compelling traffic driving content.

    It would be very interesting to follow the money and determine whether tastebuds.fm and Tima Media have any kind of business relationship. I don’t think there should be much surprise if that were found to be the case.

  5. Pingback: Psihobrlog preporučuje 28/04/2011 « PsihoBrlog

Leave a Reply