5+1 Sentences On The Walking Dead s3e3 “Walk With Me”

Posted on by TheLastPsychiatrist and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

one chants out between two worlds

An observation, and I’ll qualify it by saying this isn’t me but the logic of the show:  Totalitarianism doesn’t arrive by erosion of individual rights or worsening economic inequality, it comes because women want it.

(Non-black) Women will gladly allow total domination for the semblance of domestic freedoms– they’ll let an old man’s penis penetrate them in exchange for protection from zombies, and while I can’t say I wouldn’t make the same choice given the circumstances, it all seems a little… transactional for my romantic tastes.  But that’s how you know that the show is fake; it applies capitalist psychology to a post-capitalist setting: in a real apocalypse, she wouldn’t sleep with him for protection, she’d fall in love with him for protection.

And why is it that in fiction, anyone who starts a community is completely insane?  The good guys are always on the outside, haggard, never fitting in, while the psychopaths build aqueducts, schools, preserve life… sounds like Daddy issues…

 

And yet still they do not call them zombies.

  

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3 Responses to 5+1 Sentences On The Walking Dead s3e3 “Walk With Me”

  1. RatB says:

    The first thing I noticed about that town is that all of the women were wearing dresses. I just assumed the director was going for a “mormonish” look in order quickly to vilify the society.

    I was initially surprised that the Governor killed the national guardsmen. Why couldn’t you use a bunch more trained fighters? But I guess he wouldn’t want to take in a faction that had such potential to offer organized resistance to his leadership.

  2. Red says:

    The “good guys” are always on the outside, in my opinion, because individualism is considered innately valuable in American culture.

  3. bbrodriquez says:

    “And why is it that in fiction, anyone who starts a community is completely insane? The good guys are always on the outside, haggard, never fitting in, while the psychopaths build aqueducts, schools, preserve life…”

    Meh, I dunno, anybody ever live through a >1-week power failure? It seems totally reasonable to me that, in a post-end-of-the-world scenario, seems like the easiest, maybe the only way, to get a lot of shit done or aqueducts built is basically using methods that would be quite familiar to anyone who’s ever read “The origins of totalitarianism”…

    But I guess to be fair, I personally suffer from mad anti-authority daddy issues…

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